Using Tonglen in Anti-Oppression Pedagogy to Encourage “Being in It” rather than “Getting It" by Tracy L. Davis, Ph.D.

There’s a scene in the movie Garden State where Natalie Portman’s character exclaims, “You’re really in it” as Zach Braff portrays someone beginning to feel more sentient coming out of a long-term, lithium-induced haze.  This phrase, to me, serves as enthusiastic recognition of someone working the space between the anxiety of existence and sheer exhilaration of being alive. 

Read More

Forum Theatre: Using Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed to Build Receptive Competence By Rasha Diab, Ph.D. and Beth Godbee, Ph.D.

In our lives we often witness oppressive situations. We witness them, but do not consider the possibility of intervening. To disrupt this pattern, we find real value in Augusto Boal’s theatre of the oppressed. To educators, he is perhaps best known for his book Theatre of the Oppressed (1973).

Read More

Photovoice: Visualizing Privilege and Interrupting Learned Oppression By Phillip E. Wagner, Ph.D.

In my PhD capstone methods course, I was introduced to photovoice, a visual research methodology that is used to visually capture another’s perspective by commissioning individuals to go out and capture their own lives in a meaningful, visual way. Photovoice is an emancipatory method at its roots, used to help highlight the voices of those who are often silenced in society—victims of domestic violence (Frohmann, 2005), those with a disability (Thoutenhoofd, 1997), people of color (Douglas, 1998), LGBTQ-identified individuals (Santurri, 2014), the elderly (Baker & Wang, 2006), and more.

Read More

Larry Yang and the Practice of Intention by Beth Berila, Ph.D.

Larry Yang is well known for his work in Buddhism and social change, particularly with LGBT/ Queer communities and communities of color. In his article, “Buddhist Intention: Being Kind in Unkind Times,” from The Huffington Post, he responds to the continuous flow of violence against marginalized groups that pervades the news.

Read More

Breathing Together Through "I Can't Breathe": The Ethics and Efficacy of Mindfulness in Working Toward Justice for All, Keynote talk by Rhonda Magee, JD

Watch Professor Rhonda Magee's powerful keynote talk at the "Meeting the World" conference hosted by The Center for Mindfulness in the Spring, 2015.  In her presentation, she both leads us through practices to sit with discomfort and find some grounding and explains why these practices are so critical to both dismantling systems of oppression and healing from them.

Read More