Into the Light: Zines as Radical Healing by Itoro Udofia

Itoro Udofia creates Zines as a form of healing and self-empowerment. Zines become a creative way of resisting oppression, unlearning internalized oppression, and finding one’s own voice. “I think if we’re going to talk seriously about social justice we’re going to have to get frank about the role of radical healing and doing our internal work to reconcile the ways in which these systems of exploitations have hurt us and the people we love. We must also take the magnifying glass to our spirits and see how we have internalized some of the destructive habits that have disfigured the way we show up in the work. Are we overly concerned about being perfect? Do we have tendency to shut down the emotions and perspectives of those that are often shut down and ignored in larger society? Do we shut down our own feelings without a constructive way to address them? Do we even know what we feel? Do we run ourselves ragged in the pursuit of justice? Do we assume that social justice has to look and have a particular delivery to be right? Do we have issues with conceding power and giving up control? Do we care about making the world safer for each other, or do we just concede that since society at large is unsafe this gives us carte blanche to pass on such brutality in our organizing and academic spaces? What are you willing to let go of to heal?”

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Removing Obstacles: Using Guided Visualization to Imagine Change by Doreen Maller, Ph.D., MFT and Leane Genstler, MA

It is so easy to get stuck in patterns of fear, oppression, or habits of mind. Whether you are teaching a class in physics, calculus, creative writing or science or working in social justice and human potential sometimes the solution, answer or outcome we are searching for doesn’t seem obvious; either for the community or for your self. In fact, at times it can feel nearly impossible and unreachable to come to a settled place. Even the thought of moving from stuck and paralyzed, from not knowing how to take the next step, or realize what the next step is can feel daunting. This work, of mindful self-awareness can help open the heart and gain perspective. 

 

Unstuck...from Inaction to Action Research indicates that use of guided visualizations deepens the connection to our subconscious mind and can improve our visualization skills, which can help to improve right brain thinking. Guided visualizations also strengthen the connection between the right and left hemispheres of our brains, leading to more holistic or ‘whole brain’ thinking.

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How Mindfulness Can Defeat Racial Bias by Rhonda Magee, J.D.

Research shows that mindfulness practices help us focus, give us greater control over our emotions, and increase our capacity to think clearly and act with purpose. Might mindfulness assist police and other public servants in minimizing the mistaken judgments that lead to such harms? Might they help the rest of us—professors and deliverymen alike—minimize our biases as well?

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Forum Theatre: Using Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed to Build Receptive Competence By Rasha Diab, Ph.D. and Beth Godbee, Ph.D.

In our lives we often witness oppressive situations. We witness them, but do not consider the possibility of intervening. To disrupt this pattern, we find real value in Augusto Boal’s theatre of the oppressed. To educators, he is perhaps best known for his book Theatre of the Oppressed (1973).

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From Mindless to Mindful Dialogues about Identity By Jason Laker, Ph.D.

When people first hear terms like “mindfulness” or “contemplative,” it is common for images of cross-legged silent meditation or perhaps uttering “Om” to be conjured in the listener’s mind.  This is a stereotype of course, and like others, it is constructed from things that actually happen (i.e. seeing someone cross-legged and meditating and/or chanting) and then extrapolated into a caricature of reality. 

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Healing the Deep Grief and Wounds from Oppression By Beth Berila, Ph.D.

Oppression causes deep wounds, both individually and collectively.  It results in deeply held grief and sadness, much of which emerges when we discuss issues of oppression in social justice classrooms. Part of healing as individuals and as communities is to acknowledge those wounds and begin to heal that grief. Doing so will take time and many different paths, but pretending that it isn't present in our classrooms only makes it stronger.  

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